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Sunday, May 3, 2020 | History

3 edition of Estimated benefits of variable-geometry wing camber control for transport aircraft found in the catalog.

Estimated benefits of variable-geometry wing camber control for transport aircraft

Alexander Bolonkin

Estimated benefits of variable-geometry wing camber control for transport aircraft

  • 113 Want to read
  • 22 Currently reading

Published by National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Dryden Flight Research Center, National Technical Information Service, distributor in Edwards, Calif, Springfield, VA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Wing camber.,
  • Wind tunnel tests.,
  • Transport aircraft.,
  • Adaptive control.,
  • Cambered wings.

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesEstimated benefits of variable geometry wing camber control for transport aircraft.
    StatementAlexander Bolonkin, Glenn B. Gilyard.
    Series[NASA technical memorandum] -- NASA/TM-1999-206586., NASA technical memorandum -- 206586.
    ContributionsGilyard, Glenn B., Hugh L. Dryden Flight Research Center.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination1 v.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15559239M

    I've read all the answers here and most seem to focus on the weight and complexity. Which are valid points. However the biggest reason why it's not utilised anymore is simply the emergence of fly-by-wire systems, especially digital fly-by-wire sys. Potential Benefits to Transport Aircraft of a Continuously Variable Geometry Trailing-Edge Structure that can be Utilized for Aircraft Control, Trim, Load-Alleviation, and High Lift 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA 5b. GRANT NUMBER Grant 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr. Raj K Nangia 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5d. TASK NUMBER by: 1. The Grumman X was an American experimental aircraft that tested a forward-swept wing, canard control surfaces, and other novel aircraft technologies. The X was developed by Grumman, and the two built were flown by NASA and the United States Air Force. The aerodynamic instability of the X's airframe required the use of computerized fly-by-wire control. edge surfaces that can produce a variety of wing camber shapes (fig. 5). Variable camber capability is achieved through the use of flexible skins that are Figure 5. Variable Camber Concept deformed and positioned by internal mechanisms and controlled by a digital flight control system. This feature allows the wing to change its camber shape, so.


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Estimated benefits of variable-geometry wing camber control for transport aircraft by Alexander Bolonkin Download PDF EPUB FB2

Fuel consumption can produce savings of as much as $,/yr for each aircraft.1 Variable-camber control of the wing for drag reduction throughout the flight mission using existing control surfaces can provide the ability to realize these savings.

Variable camber is ideally suited for future aircraft becauseCited by: fuel consumption can produce savings of as much as $,/yr for each aircraft. 1 Variable-camber control of the wing for drag reduction throughout the flight mission using existing control surfaces can provide the ability to realize these savings.

Variable camber is ideally suited for future aircraft becauseCited by: Benefits of variable camber for a transport configuration using a simple trailing-edge control surface system can approach more than 10 percent, especially for nonstandard flight conditions.

In the cruise regime, the benefit is percent. control of the wing for drag reduction throughout the flight mission using existing control surfaces can provide the ability to realize these savings. Variable camber is ideally suited for future. The variable camber and twist were incorporated to allow a near optimum lift distribution over the wing for both the cruise condition and the high lift conditions for maneuverability.

Estimated Benefits of Variable-Geometry Wing Camber Control for Transport Aircraft. By Glenn B. Gilyard and Alexander Bolonkin. Abstract. Analytical benefits of variable-camber capability on subsonic transport aircraft are explored.

Using aerodynamic performance models, including drag as a function of deflection angle for control surfaces of Author: Glenn B. Gilyard and Alexander Bolonkin. NASA/rM Estimated Benefits of Variable-Geometry Wing Camber Control for Transport Aircraft Alexander Bolonkin Senior Research Associate of the National Research Council Dry den Flight Research Center Edwards, California Glenn B.

Gilyard Dry den Flight Research Center Edwards, California October The NASA STI Program Office in Profile Since its founding. abstract 1 nomenclature. Reference 37 A. Bolonkin and G. Gilyard, “Estimated Benefits of Variable-Geometry Wing Camber Control for Transport Aircraft,” Tech.

Memo. NASA Dryden Flight Res. Cent., no. OctoberReference 38 Q. Wang, Y. Chen, and H. Tang, “Mechanism Design for Aircraft Morphing Wing,” 53rd AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC : Erdoğan Kaygan, Ceren Ulusoy.

Bolonkin and G. Gilyard () Estimated Benefits of Variable-Geometry Wing Camber Control for Transport Aircraft, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Dryden Flight Research Center M. Kintscher, M. Wiedemann, H. Monner, O. Heintze, and T. Kühn () Design of a Smart Leading. BibTeX @MISC{Senior_estimatedbenefits, author = {Alexander Bolonkin Senior and Glenn B.

Gilyard}, title = {Estimated Benefits of Variable-Geometry Wing Camber Control for Transport Aircraft}, year = {}}. Estimated benefits of variable-geometry wing chamber control for transport aircraft (OCoLC) Online version: Bolonkin, Alexander.

Estimated benefits of variable-geometry wing camber control for transport aircraft (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors. ‘‘Estimated Benefits of Variable-Geometry Wing Camber Control for Transport Aircraft,’’ Technical Memorandum, NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA, NASA /TM Google ScholarCited by:   Bolonkin A, Gilyard GB () Estimated benefits of variable-geometry wing camber control for transport aircraft.

NASA-TM Google Scholar Boltz FW, Pena DF () Aerodynamic characteristics of an F-8 aircraft configuration with a variable camber wing at Mach numbers from to Author: Yi Liu, Shaoxiu Ouyang, Xiaoxia Zhao.

A conventional Fowler flap is designed to improve the take-off and landing performances of an aircraft. Because the flight states of general aviation aircraft vary significantly.

A Fowler flap with a double-sliding track has been designed, which is capable of changing airfoil camber while cruising and climbing as well as meeting low-speed performance requirements. For the first research pro- Variable wing camber for transport aircraft gram a basic wing I was chosen which resembled a typical advanced design of a transport aircraft.

Before the proposed camber modifications, an extensive and detailed analysis of the wing characteristics was by: model of a variable camber wing. An aerodynamic model of a homogeneous wing employing variable camber actuation was developed based on the vortex lattice method and was applied to the approach and landing phases (low speed, steady state, high angle of attack) of a civil transport aircraft.

The aerodynamic modelAuthor: Tristan. Martindale. [] Bolonkin A. and Gilyard G. B., “ Estimated Benefits of Variable-Geometry Wing Camber Control for Transport Aircraft,” NASA TM, Oct.

Google Scholar [] Martin G. L., Beissner F. and Domack C. by: Cruise drag reduction of variable camber wing of wide-body civil transport: WANG Bin, HAO Xuan, GUO Shaojie, SU Cheng: China Academy of Aerospace Aerodynamics, BeijingChina.

Numerical simulations are performed to study the outboard airfoil of advanced technology regional aircraft (ATRA) wings with five different variable camber continuous trailing edge flap (VCCTEF) configurations.

The computational study aims to improve the aerodynamic efficiency of the airfoil under cruise conditions.

The design of outboard airfoil complies with the hybrid laminar flow control Author: Mohammed Abdul Raheem, Prasetyo Edi, Amjad A. Pasha, Mustafa M. Rahman, Khalid A. Juhany. This hybrid trailing edge control surface was developed within the scope of CHANGE Gilyard, G.B.

Estimated Benefits of Variable-Geometry Wing Camber Control for Transport Aircraft; NASA/TM H. Variable Wing Camber Control for Civil Transport Aircraft. In Proceedings of 14th Congress of the International Council of the Cited by: 4. ESTIMATED BENEFITS OF VARIABLE-GEOMETRY WING CAMBER CONTROL FOR TRANSPORT AIRCRAFT.

Authors: Alexander Bolonkin and Glenn B. Gilyard Report Number: NASA-TM Performing Organization: NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA Abstract: Analytical benefits of variable-camber capability on subsonic transport aircraft are explored.

Distributed actuation concepts for a morphing aileron device - Volume Issue - G. Amendola, I. Dimino, M. Magnifico, R. Pecora you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account.

G.B. Estimated benefits of variable-geometry wing camber control for transport aircraft, NASA/TM, Cited by: A variable-sweep wing, colloquially known as a "swing wing", is an airplane wing, or set of wings, that may be swept back and then returned to its original straight position during allows the aircraft's shape to be modified in flight, and is therefore an example of a variable-geometry aircraft.

A straight wing is most efficient for low-speed flight, but for an aircraft designed for. linkage system embedded inside the wing, was designed as another means to vary the shape of a wing. This variable camber wing did not involve complicated actuation components or a control system, but effectively provided satisfactory changes in wing camber.

A change in camber of 10% before applying the wing skin, andFile Size: KB. Variable camber is a feature of some of aircraft wings that changes the camber (or curvature) of the main aerofoil during flight. In one system, the leading and/or trailing edge sections of the whole wing pivot to increase the effective camber of the wing.

This may be used to increase the maximum lift coefficient in order to shorten the take-off run, or to enhance manoeuvrability in the air. Bolonkin, A, Gilyard, GB () Estimated benefits of variable-geometry wing camber control for transport aircraft.

NASA TMOctoberNational Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Dryden Flight Research Centre. Google ScholarCited by: Bolonkin, A., Gilyard, G.B.: Estimated Benefits of Variable-Geometry Wing Camber Control for Transport Aircraft. NASA TM, Dryden Flight Author: K. Chung, P. Chang. The F was already a swing-wing aircraft, but this modification was a supercricital mission-adaptive wing with smooth variable camber, similar to the aero-elastic wing already mentioned.

Flight research concept can be read here and results can be read here. control effectiveness/authority and L/D efficiency in executing roll maneuvers compared to the baseline quarter-scale vehicle with traditional aileron-control; (7) develop the concept for a full flight control architecture with distribute wing-morphing of a transport-class aircraft, and (8) develop models and simulation tools that allowFile Size: 1MB.

The wing configuration of a fixed-wing aircraft (including both gliders and powered aeroplanes) is its arrangement of lifting and related surfaces. Aircraft designs are often classified by their wing configuration. For example, the Supermarine Spitfire is a conventional low wing cantilever monoplane of straight elliptical planform with moderate aspect ratio and slight dihedral.

The contribution of the present paper is to simulate a smart flap under ground effect. In this simulation, the effect of attack angle, flap angle, ground clearance on airfoil with the smart and conventional flaps are assessed. Estimated benefits of variable-geometry wing camber control for transport aircraft, NASA TMCited by: Aerodynamic Analysis of Variable Geometry Raked Wingtips for Mid-Range Transonic Transport Aircraft David J.

Jingeleski ABSTRACT Previous applications have shown that a wingtip treatment on a commercial airliner will reduce drag and increase fuel efficiency and the most common types of treatment are blended winglets and raked wingtips. 21st Century Collection of NASA and NACA Dryden Technical Reports: X-Plane, SR, Space Shuttle, Hypersonic Research, Fighter Planes (Two CD-ROM Set) [News, World Spaceflight] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

21st Century Collection of NASA and NACA Dryden Technical Reports: X-Plane, SR, Space Shuttle, Hypersonic ResearchPrice: $ Variable camber wing concepts have been explored and developed extensively since the beginning of flight.

The wing warping of the Wright Flyer, which used the pulling of cables to change the configuration of the wing tips was considered the first variable camber wing concept. The most significant variable camber File Size: 1MB. Bolonkin A, Gilyard GB.

Estimated benefits of variable-geometry wing camber control for transport aircraft. NASA TM, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Dryden Flight Research Center, The focus was to investigate the effects of tunnel background noise on compressible convex-corner flows, which correspond to the upper control surface of an aircraft wing.

External acoustic disturbance has a minor effect on the mean surface pressure distributions, including flow expansion and recompression near the by: 5. Additional benefits lie with cruise camber control in maximizing vehicle efficiency during straight and level flight.

Based on a study of a subsonic transport aircraft at low speed and cruise flight regimes the benefits of camber Bolonkin A and Gilyard G B Estimated benefits of variable-geometry wing camber control for transport Cited by: Bolonkin A, Gilyard GB.

Estimated benefits of variable-geometry wing camber control for transport aircraft. NASA TM, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Dryden Flight Research Center, Cited by: 2. [7] A. Bolonkin and G. Gilyard. Estimated benefits of variable-geometry wing camber control for transport aircraft.

Technical Report TM, NASA, October [8] N. Borer. Design and analysis of low Reynolds number airfoils, Industrial. INVESTIGATION OF ADAPTIVE WING BENEFITS FOR TRANSPORT AIRCRAFT wing is carried out by finite-difference technique.

Cebeci-Smith algebraic model as well as a non-equilibrium Spallart-Almares model of turbulent viscosity are utilized. The transpiration effect of a boundary layer on an external flow is modeled by an appropriate.A. Bolonkin and G. B. Gilyard, “Estimated benefits of variable-geometry wing camber control for transport aircraft,” NASA TM, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Dryden Flight Research Center, View at: Google ScholarCited by: 2.Transport aircraft wings are designed to meet a set of multidisciplinary technical requirements which cover aerodynamic performance, propulsion, stability and control, weight, structures, aeroelasticity, systems, production techniques, etc.

the final aerodynamic configuration of an aircraft wing are determined by several factors, only one.